Indians vs Twins

Indians vs Twins : Baldelli will have nine tickets left MLB 2019 at will call for visiting family and friends. Beyond that, he said he hasn’t been mulling the magnitude of the moment surrounding his first game as a manager, having been too busy trying to get his players ready Baldelli played with the Boston Red Sox in 2019.

The hurdles baseball faces in getting eyeballs to TV sets – cord-cutting, an endless sea of streaming options, the NFL’s 12-month news cycle, Fortnite – are not going away. Its ace in the hole has always been its massive amount of inventory and the unmatchable, pastoral setting a day at the ballpark affords.

Well, the inventory is sagging: Attendance dropped 4% in 2018. We’ve yet to see the long-term effects tanking and extreme roster churn in the analytics age have on fan loyalty.So why not let everyone – as many as you can cram into your stadium, anyway – get a taste of the product, for free.

Just ask the A’s about that. They took the randomest possible date last year– a midweek April game against the White Sox – and charged no admission.More than 46,000 showed up to the antiquated Oakland Coliseum, by far their largest crowd of the year.

Certainly, there’d be financial repercussions. Teams drew an average of 29,000 for their Game No. 2 date last year, which would mean an average loss of about $900,000 in ticket revenue per club. Those losses could be partially mitigated by selling naming rights for this day – what national brand wouldn’t want to be associated with free baseball? – and an uptick in concession revenue.

The short-term revenue loss is beside the point, of course. And it’s possible some execs would argue giving away the product cheapens it.Then again, it can’t be any worse than seas of empty seats that provide the backdrop for a significant number of April and September games. The good vibes could be milked for nearly two weeks, as the teams that started the season on the road eventually roll out their free game.At the least, it would inject some warmth into baseball’s coldest month.

Opening Day is in the books. With all due respect to last week’s Japan Series, the 2019 MLB regular season began in earnest Thursday. All 30 teams were in action with 15 games spread across the afternoon and evening. Spring training games are fun in their own way. Nothing quite compares to meaningful baseball though.

On the first full day of 2019, Bryce Harper made his debut with the Phillies (with Phillie Phanatic cleats), the Dodgers hit an Opening Day record eight homers, and Jordan Zimmermann flirted with a perfect game. Here is everything else you need to know about the season’s first day
Major League Baseball’s schedule parcels 2,430 games across 187 days. Not all will be idyllic.

There will be days and nights in September devoid of meaning. Punishingly hot summer stretches that make going to a game a physical challenge. And stretches of endless winter in certain parts of the country.Yet if you had to identify one day that almost always feels like a drag, it is this, the second day of the season.

Oh, some of Opening Day’s appeal endures: Nobody’s out of contention. The new slate of walk-up songs and between-pitches music still feel fresh, and not yet grating.The staff ace pitched yesterday. The franchise legend who threw out the first pitch has given way to the usual parade of regional vice presidents and Kiwanis Club chairs. The only flyovers might come from malnourished seagulls.

And the affliction seems particularly acute this year, as for the first time 30 teams opened on the same day.On Day 2, at a time when players, fans, fantasy diehards and degenerate gamblers remain hungry for action, 14 of 30 teams are taking the day off.

Now, there’s good reason for that, as MLB typically builds in an insurance day to make up season-openers in the event of postponements in cold-weather markets.More often, though, stadiums sit empty for no reason. Elsewhere, attendance drops precipitously, as the fair-weather crowd fades and a truer snapshot of a team’s season-ticket base emerges.

A view of Dodger Stadium before the opening day game against the Diamondbacks.A view of Dodger Stadium before the opening day game against the Diamondbacks. (Photo: Kelvin Kuo, USA TODAY Sports)It’s a grim prelude to a herky-jerky month littered with off days, weather delays and, generally, poor attendance.

No other sport faces such hurdles just as its season is getting off the ground. So, here’s one solution.Game 1 is for the dignitaries. Game 2 is for the people: Let them all in for free.

Let’s call this Fans’ Opening Day, or something similar. The premise is simple: At a time when baseball is once again battling demons such as access, appeal and viability, letting anyone come in and see a field of green, glorious grass and their favorite stars would be both a thank you to current fans and an invitation to the nonbelievers.

Smaller venues create ticket scarcity, which means much higher prices. That’s great for bottom lines.But think about this for a moment: The younger generation MLB hopes to court can barely afford housing, let alone owning a home, having children or retiring their crippling student loan debt. The average age of a fan watching on TV is already north of 55 – a generation that fell in love with the sport when attending games was far more affordable.c

Perhaps it would be viewed in some quarters as a move unbecoming such a wildly profitable industry; MLB is chugging toward $11 billion in annual revenue.Yet the sport is filled with paradoxes that threaten sustainability.

The wildly-inflated, multi-billion dollar national and local TV contracts that enrichen everyone also ensures a wall of access must go up to protect that golden goose. The next generation of fans is essentially diverted – or barred altogether – from viewing their favorite team in the manner they’d prefer.At the ballpark, things are only getting more exclusive.

Stadiums both current and planned are shrinking; the Tampa Bay Rays reduced Tropicana Field capacity to 25,000 and hope to build a permanent ballpark with similar dimensions. The Texas Rangers’ new ballpark will shrink capacity from 48,000 to around 40,000. The Oakland Athletics’ dream home at Howard Terminal, should it ever be built, would seat 34,000, fewer seats than any park built in the last wave of construction.

Blue Jays vs Tigers

Blue Jays vs Tigers : The Detroit Tigers and the Toronto Blue Jays will match up in MLB activity on Sunday.The two teams split the first pair of games in this set, then on Saturday, the Jays took a 3-0 victory.In the loss Saturday, Detroit’s Miguel Cabrera managed a pair of hits, while Josh Harrison went 1-for-3 with a walk.

We are two games into the 2019 season, and the Tigers have yet to score a run in a regular nine-inning game. Christin Stewart’s game-winning jack on Thursday is all of the offense they have mustered so far. Nicholas Castellanos has half of the team’s six hits on the year. Luckily, this has been enough for the Tigers to come away with a split in the first two games of the year.

This won’t continue going forward, obviously. The Tigers will start to score more runs, especially as the middle of their lineup wakes up. After Castellanos, the Tigers’ No. 3-5 hitters are a combined 2-for-21 with two walks. Jeimer Candelario quietly finished Friday’s game with a golden sombrero, and has struck out five times in his eight plate appearances this season. Miguel Cabrera walked on Friday, but otherwise has not looked sharp after a strong spring.

So why are we so concerned about this after just two games? Selfish reasons, naturally. Spencer Turnbull will make his season debut on Saturday, marking another small step towards the next era of Tigers baseball. He looked solid at times in his brief September call-up last year, with 15 strikeouts in 16 1⁄3 innings, and he made his case for a rotation spot with an excellent spring.

There’s no telling whether Turnbull really would have made the rotation if Michael Fulmer stayed healthy. Manager Ron Gardenhire says he considered a six-man unit, but he likes jokes sometimes. Either way, Fulmer’s injury has created an opportunity for someone to step up, and Turnbull is the first candidate. Here’s hoping he shows us more of this in 2019.The Detroit Tigers’ scoreless innings streak has expanded to 18 as they were shut out for the second time in as many days, dropping game three to the Toronto Blue Jays by a score of 3-0.

The Blue Jays opened the day’s scoring, as they did on Friday, in the fourth inning. Brandon Drury, following a leadoff double, came around to score on a Billy McKinney single. Justin Smoak would help to pile it on as he buried a two-run home run to the opposite field. They would threaten again through the later innings, but these wouldn’t come to pass.

The Tigers threatened in each of the first three innings, but failed to capitalize against Blue Jays pitching, as starter Aaron Sanchez shut them down over five-plus innings of work, limiting them to three hits. Despite having two men in scoring position in the sixth inning, the Blue Jays bullpen picked up the slack, quelling that threat while allowing just one hit of their own while contributing seven of the day’s 13 Tigers strikeouts.

Noteworthy
Spencer Turnbull, making his first start of 2019, looked sharp during his first trip through the Blue Jays’ order, but hit a rough patch with a ragged fourth inning and less-than-confident fifth inning. He made his exit after five innings, giving up three runs on four hits while walking two batters and striking out five. He showed some live velocity on his fastball, sitting in the 94-96 miles per hour range, as well as life on his slider:The Detroit Tigers and the Toronto Blue Jays will match up in MLB activity on Sunday.

The two teams split the first pair of games in this set, then on Saturday, the Jays took a 3-0 victory.

In the loss Saturday, Detroit’s Miguel Cabrera managed a pair of hits, while Josh Harrison went 1-for-3 with a walk. Nick Castellanos had a mediocre day as well with a 1-for-4 line.

For Sunday’s game, the Tigers are rolling with lefty Matt Moore. In his 102.0 innings in 2018, Moore came up with a 6.79 ERA, 86 strikeout sand a 3-8 record overall.

As for the Jays, their lead player in the Saturday game was Justin Smoak, who bagged a couple of RBI. Brandon Drury had a run and a hit, while Danny Jansen went 1-for-4.In the Sunday game, the Jays will send out Trent Thornton for the start. This will be Thornton’s Major-League debut, plugging the hole while Toronto works out some injury situations.

The Tigers are 29-62 in the last 91 overall and 3-8 in the last 11 Sunday games Detroit is 6-21 in their last 27 in game four of a series and 1-4 in the last five on turf.

Meanwhile, the Jays are 14-38 in their last 52 versus a left-handed starter and 1-5 in the last six in game four of a series. Toronto is 1-6 in the last seven home games versus a left-handed starter and the under is 7-0 in their last seven home games.

This has been a weird series so far. In all three games, the loser has failed to find the scoreboard, and aside from the Jays’ six runs on Friday there have only been five other scores in this set.

Still, with the Jays at home and hitting better (usually), and even with the rookie on the hill I have to go with Toronto in the finale win.

Brewers vs Cardinals

Brewers vs Cardinals : The Milwaukee Brewers outfielder Christian 2019 MLB Yelich and outfielder Ryan Braun pose for a photo with former Brewers Rollie Fingers and Robin Yount after they threw out ceremonial first pitches before their game against the St. Louis Cardinals at Miller Park.Manager Mike Shildt of the Cardinals and Milwaukee’s Craig Counsell find.

Smaller venues create ticket scarcity, which means much higher prices. That’s great for bottom lines.But think about this for a moment: The younger generation MLB hopes to court can barely afford housing, let alone owning a home, having children or retiring their crippling student loan debt. The average age of a fan watching on TV is already north of 55 – a generation that fell in love with the sport when attending games was far more affordable.c

The hurdles baseball faces in getting eyeballs to TV sets – cord-cutting, an endless sea of streaming options, the NFL’s 12-month news cycle, Fortnite – are not going away. Its ace in the hole has always been its massive amount of inventory and the unmatchable, pastoral setting a day at the ballpark affords.

Well, the inventory is sagging: Attendance dropped 4% in 2018. We’ve yet to see the long-term effects tanking and extreme roster churn in the analytics age have on fan loyalty.So why not let everyone – as many as you can cram into your stadium, anyway – get a taste of the product, for free.

Just ask the A’s about that. They took the randomest possible date last year– a midweek April game against the White Sox – and charged no admission.More than 46,000 showed up to the antiquated Oakland Coliseum, by far their largest crowd of the year.

Certainly, there’d be financial repercussions. Teams drew an average of 29,000 for their Game No. 2 date last year, which would mean an average loss of about $900,000 in ticket revenue per club. Those losses could be partially mitigated by selling naming rights for this day – what national brand wouldn’t want to be associated with free baseball? – and an uptick in concession revenue.

The short-term revenue loss is beside the point, of course. And it’s possible some execs would argue giving away the product cheapens it.Then again, it can’t be any worse than seas of empty seats that provide the backdrop for a significant number of April and September games. The good vibes could be milked for nearly two weeks, as the teams that started the season on the road eventually roll out their free game.At the least, it would inject some warmth into baseball’s coldest month.

Opening Day is in the books. With all due respect to last week’s Japan Series, the 2019 MLB regular season began in earnest Thursday. All 30 teams were in action with 15 games spread across the afternoon and evening. Spring training games are fun in their own way. Nothing quite compares to meaningful baseball though.

On the first full day of 2019, Bryce Harper made his debut with the Phillies (with Phillie Phanatic cleats), the Dodgers hit an Opening Day record eight homers, and Jordan Zimmermann flirted with a perfect game. Here is everything else you need to know about the season’s first day
Major League Baseball’s schedule parcels 2,430 games across 187 days. Not all will be idyllic.

There will be days and nights in September devoid of meaning. Punishingly hot summer stretches that make going to a game a physical challenge. And stretches of endless winter in certain parts of the country.Yet if you had to identify one day that almost always feels like a drag, it is this, the second day of the season.

Oh, some of Opening Day’s appeal endures: Nobody’s out of contention. The new slate of walk-up songs and between-pitches music still feel fresh, and not yet grating.The staff ace pitched yesterday. The franchise legend who threw out the first pitch has given way to the usual parade of regional vice presidents and Kiwanis Club chairs. The only flyovers might come from malnourished seagulls.

And the affliction seems particularly acute this year, as for the first time 30 teams opened on the same day.On Day 2, at a time when players, fans, fantasy diehards and degenerate gamblers remain hungry for action, 14 of 30 teams are taking the day off.

Now, there’s good reason for that, as MLB typically builds in an insurance day to make up season-openers in the event of postponements in cold-weather markets.More often, though, stadiums sit empty for no reason. Elsewhere, attendance drops precipitously, as the fair-weather crowd fades and a truer snapshot of a team’s season-ticket base emerges.

A view of Dodger Stadium before the opening day game against the Diamondbacks.A view of Dodger Stadium before the opening day game against the Diamondbacks. (Photo: Kelvin Kuo, USA TODAY Sports)It’s a grim prelude to a herky-jerky month littered with off days, weather delays and, generally, poor attendance.

No other sport faces such hurdles just as its season is getting off the ground. So, here’s one solution.Game 1 is for the dignitaries. Game 2 is for the people: Let them all in for free.

 

Let’s call this Fans’ Opening Day, or something similar. The premise is simple: At a time when baseball is once again battling demons such as access, appeal and viability, letting anyone come in and see a field of green, glorious grass and their favorite stars would be both a thank you to current fans and an invitation to the nonbelievers.

Perhaps it would be viewed in some quarters as a move unbecoming such a wildly profitable industry; MLB is chugging toward $11 billion in annual revenue.Yet the sport is filled with paradoxes that threaten sustainability.

The wildly-inflated, multi-billion dollar national and local TV contracts that enrichen everyone also ensures a wall of access must go up to protect that golden goose. The next generation of fans is essentially diverted – or barred altogether – from viewing their favorite team in the manner they’d prefer.At the ballpark, things are only getting more exclusive.

Stadiums both current and planned are shrinking; the Tampa Bay Rays reduced Tropicana Field capacity to 25,000 and hope to build a permanent ballpark with similar dimensions. The Texas Rangers’ new ballpark will shrink capacity from 48,000 to around 40,000. The Oakland Athletics’ dream home at Howard Terminal, should it ever be built, would seat 34,000, fewer seats than any park built in the last wave of construction.

 

Nationals vs Mets

Nationals vs Mets : The Washington Nationals hosted the 2019 MBL Game New York Mets for Opening Day with Max Scherzer, last year’s Cy Young runner-up, squaring off against Mets starter Jacob deGrom, last year’s Cy Young winner. See live coverage of the loss below. And join the conversation in the comments.

The short-term revenue loss is beside the point, of course. And it’s possible some execs would argue giving away the product cheapens it.Then again, it can’t be any worse than seas of empty seats that provide the backdrop for a significant number of April and September games. The good vibes could be milked for nearly two weeks, as the teams that started the season on the road eventually roll out their free game.At the least, it would inject some warmth into baseball’s coldest month.

Opening Day is in the books. With all due respect to last week’s Japan Series, the 2019 MLB regular season began in earnest Thursday. All 30 teams were in action with 15 games spread across the afternoon and evening. Spring training games are fun in their own way. Nothing quite compares to meaningful baseball though.

On the first full day of 2019, Bryce Harper made his debut with the Phillies (with Phillie Phanatic cleats), the Dodgers hit an Opening Day record eight homers, and Jordan Zimmermann flirted with a perfect game. Here is everything else you need to know about the season’s first day
Major League Baseball’s schedule parcels 2,430 games across 187 days. Not all will be idyllic.

There will be days and nights in September devoid of meaning. Punishingly hot summer stretches that make going to a game a physical challenge. And stretches of endless winter in certain parts of the country.Yet if you had to identify one day that almost always feels like a drag, it is this, the second day of the season.

Oh, some of Opening Day’s appeal endures: Nobody’s out of contention. The new slate of walk-up songs and between-pitches music still feel fresh, and not yet grating.The staff ace pitched yesterday. The franchise legend who threw out the first pitch has given way to the usual parade of regional vice presidents and Kiwanis Club chairs. The only flyovers might come from malnourished seagulls.

And the affliction seems particularly acute this year, as for the first time 30 teams opened on the same day.On Day 2, at a time when players, fans, fantasy diehards and degenerate gamblers remain hungry for action, 14 of 30 teams are taking the day off.

Now, there’s good reason for that, as MLB typically builds in an insurance day to make up season-openers in the event of postponements in cold-weather markets.More often, though, stadiums sit empty for no reason. Elsewhere, attendance drops precipitously, as the fair-weather crowd fades and a truer snapshot of a team’s season-ticket base emerges.

A view of Dodger Stadium before the opening day game against the Diamondbacks.A view of Dodger Stadium before the opening day game against the Diamondbacks. (Photo: Kelvin Kuo, USA TODAY Sports)It’s a grim prelude to a herky-jerky month littered with off days, weather delays and, generally, poor attendance.

No other sport faces such hurdles just as its season is getting off the ground. So, here’s one solution.Game 1 is for the dignitaries. Game 2 is for the people: Let them all in for free.

Let’s call this Fans’ Opening Day, or something similar. The premise is simple: At a time when baseball is once again battling demons such as access, appeal and viability, letting anyone come in and see a field of green, glorious grass and their favorite stars would be both a thank you to current fans and an invitation to the nonbelievers.

Perhaps it would be viewed in some quarters as a move unbecoming such a wildly profitable industry; MLB is chugging toward $11 billion in annual revenue.Yet the sport is filled with paradoxes that threaten sustainability.

The wildly-inflated, multi-billion dollar national and local TV contracts that enrichen everyone also ensures a wall of access must go up to protect that golden goose. The next generation of fans is essentially diverted – or barred altogether – from viewing their favorite team in the manner they’d prefer.At the ballpark, things are only getting more exclusive.

Stadiums both current and planned are shrinking; the Tampa Bay Rays reduced Tropicana Field capacity to 25,000 and hope to build a permanent ballpark with similar dimensions. The Texas Rangers’ new ballpark will shrink capacity from 48,000 to around 40,000. The Oakland Athletics’ dream home at Howard Terminal, should it ever be built, would seat 34,000, fewer seats than any park built in the last wave of construction.

Smaller venues create ticket scarcity, which means much higher prices. That’s great for bottom lines.But think about this for a moment: The younger generation MLB hopes to court can barely afford housing, let alone owning a home, having children or retiring their crippling student loan debt. The average age of a fan watching on TV is already north of 55 – a generation that fell in love with the sport when attending games was far more affordable.c

The hurdles baseball faces in getting eyeballs to TV sets – cord-cutting, an endless sea of streaming options, the NFL’s 12-month news cycle, Fortnite – are not going away. Its ace in the hole has always been its massive amount of inventory and the unmatchable, pastoral setting a day at the ballpark affords.

Well, the inventory is sagging: Attendance dropped 4% in 2018. We’ve yet to see the long-term effects tanking and extreme roster churn in the analytics age have on fan loyalty.So why not let everyone – as many as you can cram into your stadium, anyway – get a taste of the product, for free.

Just ask the A’s about that. They took the randomest possible date last year– a midweek April game against the White Sox – and charged no admission.More than 46,000 showed up to the antiquated Oakland Coliseum, by far their largest crowd of the year.

Certainly, there’d be financial repercussions. Teams drew an average of 29,000 for their Game No. 2 date last year, which would mean an average loss of about $900,000 in ticket revenue per club. Those losses could be partially mitigated by selling naming rights for this day – what national brand wouldn’t want to be associated with free baseball? – and an uptick in concession revenue.

 

Reds vs Pirates

Reds vs Pirates : The Bucs will also host the Reds for four games during the first homestand of the The Pirates are now taking deposits on 2019 Pirates .Opening Day 2019 Cincinnati Reds beat the Pittsburgh Pirates 5-3. Bobby Nightengale and Adam Baum, Cincinnati Enquirer Published.

Let’s call this Fans’ Opening Day, or something similar. The premise is simple: At a time when baseball is once again battling demons such as access, appeal and viability, letting anyone come in and see a field of green, glorious grass and their favorite stars would be both a thank you to current fans and an invitation to the nonbelievers.

Perhaps it would be viewed in some quarters as a move unbecoming such a wildly profitable industry; MLB is chugging toward $11 billion in annual revenue.Yet the sport is filled with paradoxes that threaten sustainability.

The wildly-inflated, multi-billion dollar national and local TV contracts that enrichen everyone also ensures a wall of access must go up to protect that golden goose. The next generation of fans is essentially diverted – or barred altogether – from viewing their favorite team in the manner they’d prefer.At the ballpark, things are only getting more exclusive.

Stadiums both current and planned are shrinking; the Tampa Bay Rays reduced Tropicana Field capacity to 25,000 and hope to build a permanent ballpark with similar dimensions. The Texas Rangers’ new ballpark will shrink capacity from 48,000 to around 40,000. The Oakland Athletics’ dream home at Howard Terminal, should it ever be built, would seat 34,000, fewer seats than any park built in the last wave of construction.

Smaller venues create ticket scarcity, which means much higher prices. That’s great for bottom lines.But think about this for a moment: The younger generation MLB hopes to court can barely afford housing, let alone owning a home, having children or retiring their crippling student loan debt. The average age of a fan watching on TV is already north of 55 – a generation that fell in love with the sport when attending games was far more affordable.c

The hurdles baseball faces in getting eyeballs to TV sets – cord-cutting, an endless sea of streaming options, the NFL’s 12-month news cycle, Fortnite – are not going away. Its ace in the hole has always been its massive amount of inventory and the unmatchable, pastoral setting a day at the ballpark affords.

Well, the inventory is sagging: Attendance dropped 4% in 2018. We’ve yet to see the long-term effects tanking and extreme roster churn in the analytics age have on fan loyalty.So why not let everyone – as many as you can cram into your stadium, anyway – get a taste of the product, for free.

Just ask the A’s about that. They took the randomest possible date last year– a midweek April game against the White Sox – and charged no admission.More than 46,000 showed up to the antiquated Oakland Coliseum, by far their largest crowd of the year.

Certainly, there’d be financial repercussions. Teams drew an average of 29,000 for their Game No. 2 date last year, which would mean an average loss of about $900,000 in ticket revenue per club. Those losses could be partially mitigated by selling naming rights for this day – what national brand wouldn’t want to be associated with free baseball? – and an uptick in concession revenue.

The short-term revenue loss is beside the point, of course. And it’s possible some execs would argue giving away the product cheapens it.Then again, it can’t be any worse than seas of empty seats that provide the backdrop for a significant number of April and September games. The good vibes could be milked for nearly two weeks, as the teams that started the season on the road eventually roll out their free game.At the least, it would inject some warmth into baseball’s coldest month.

Opening Day is in the books. With all due respect to last week’s Japan Series, the 2019 MLB regular season began in earnest Thursday. All 30 teams were in action with 15 games spread across the afternoon and evening. Spring training games are fun in their own way. Nothing quite compares to meaningful baseball though.

On the first full day of 2019, Bryce Harper made his debut with the Phillies (with Phillie Phanatic cleats), the Dodgers hit an Opening Day record eight homers, and Jordan Zimmermann flirted with a perfect game. Here is everything else you need to know about the season’s first day
Major League Baseball’s schedule parcels 2,430 games across 187 days. Not all will be idyllic.

There will be days and nights in September devoid of meaning. Punishingly hot summer stretches that make going to a game a physical challenge. And stretches of endless winter in certain parts of the country.Yet if you had to identify one day that almost always feels like a drag, it is this, the second day of the season.

Oh, some of Opening Day’s appeal endures: Nobody’s out of contention. The new slate of walk-up songs and between-pitches music still feel fresh, and not yet grating.The staff ace pitched yesterday. The franchise legend who threw out the first pitch has given way to the usual parade of regional vice presidents and Kiwanis Club chairs. The only flyovers might come from malnourished seagulls.

And the affliction seems particularly acute this year, as for the first time 30 teams opened on the same day.On Day 2, at a time when players, fans, fantasy diehards and degenerate gamblers remain hungry for action, 14 of 30 teams are taking the day off.

Now, there’s good reason for that, as MLB typically builds in an insurance day to make up season-openers in the event of postponements in cold-weather markets.More often, though, stadiums sit empty for no reason. Elsewhere, attendance drops precipitously, as the fair-weather crowd fades and a truer snapshot of a team’s season-ticket base emerges.

A view of Dodger Stadium before the opening day game against the Diamondbacks.A view of Dodger Stadium before the opening day game against the Diamondbacks. (Photo: Kelvin Kuo, USA TODAY Sports)It’s a grim prelude to a herky-jerky month littered with off days, weather delays and, generally, poor attendance.

No other sport faces such hurdles just as its season is getting off the ground. So, here’s one solution.Game 1 is for the dignitaries. Game 2 is for the people: Let them all in for free.

 

 

Rockies vs Marlins

Rockies vs Marlins : Freeland will become the 19th opening day MLB 2019 Game starter in franchise history and is making his first start against the Marlins. He finished fourth in the National League Cy Young Award voting last season after posting the lowest full-season ERA in team history. Urena is making his second straight opening day start. He pitched very well last September, going 5-0 with a 1.20 ERA.

The hurdles baseball faces in getting eyeballs to TV sets – cord-cutting, an endless sea of streaming options, the NFL’s 12-month news cycle, Fortnite – are not going away. Its ace in the hole has always been its massive amount of inventory and the unmatchable, pastoral setting a day at the ballpark affords.

Well, the inventory is sagging: Attendance dropped 4% in 2018. We’ve yet to see the long-term effects tanking and extreme roster churn in the analytics age have on fan loyalty.So why not let everyone – as many as you can cram into your stadium, anyway – get a taste of the product, for free.

Just ask the A’s about that. They took the randomest possible date last year– a midweek April game against the White Sox – and charged no admission.More than 46,000 showed up to the antiquated Oakland Coliseum, by far their largest crowd of the year.

Certainly, there’d be financial repercussions. Teams drew an average of 29,000 for their Game No. 2 date last year, which would mean an average loss of about $900,000 in ticket revenue per club. Those losses could be partially mitigated by selling naming rights for this day – what national brand wouldn’t want to be associated with free baseball? – and an uptick in concession revenue.

The short-term revenue loss is beside the point, of course. And it’s possible some execs would argue giving away the product cheapens it.Then again, it can’t be any worse than seas of empty seats that provide the backdrop for a significant number of April and September games. The good vibes could be milked for nearly two weeks, as the teams that started the season on the road eventually roll out their free game.At the least, it would inject some warmth into baseball’s coldest month.

Opening Day is in the books. With all due respect to last week’s Japan Series, the 2019 MLB regular season began in earnest Thursday. All 30 teams were in action with 15 games spread across the afternoon and evening. Spring training games are fun in their own way. Nothing quite compares to meaningful baseball though.

On the first full day of 2019, Bryce Harper made his debut with the Phillies (with Phillie Phanatic cleats), the Dodgers hit an Opening Day record eight homers, and Jordan Zimmermann flirted with a perfect game. Here is everything else you need to know about the season’s first day
Major League Baseball’s schedule parcels 2,430 games across 187 days. Not all will be idyllic.

There will be days and nights in September devoid of meaning. Punishingly hot summer stretches that make going to a game a physical challenge. And stretches of endless winter in certain parts of the country.Yet if you had to identify one day that almost always feels like a drag, it is this, the second day of the season.

Oh, some of Opening Day’s appeal endures: Nobody’s out of contention. The new slate of walk-up songs and between-pitches music still feel fresh, and not yet grating.The staff ace pitched yesterday. The franchise legend who threw out the first pitch has given way to the usual parade of regional vice presidents and Kiwanis Club chairs. The only flyovers might come from malnourished seagulls.

And the affliction seems particularly acute this year, as for the first time 30 teams opened on the same day.On Day 2, at a time when players, fans, fantasy diehards and degenerate gamblers remain hungry for action, 14 of 30 teams are taking the day off.

Now, there’s good reason for that, as MLB typically builds in an insurance day to make up season-openers in the event of postponements in cold-weather markets.More often, though, stadiums sit empty for no reason. Elsewhere, attendance drops precipitously, as the fair-weather crowd fades and a truer snapshot of a team’s season-ticket base emerges.

A view of Dodger Stadium before the opening day game against the Diamondbacks.A view of Dodger Stadium before the opening day game against the Diamondbacks. (Photo: Kelvin Kuo, USA TODAY Sports)It’s a grim prelude to a herky-jerky month littered with off days, weather delays and, generally, poor attendance.

No other sport faces such hurdles just as its season is getting off the ground. So, here’s one solution.Game 1 is for the dignitaries. Game 2 is for the people: Let them all in for free.

Let’s call this Fans’ Opening Day, or something similar. The premise is simple: At a time when baseball is once again battling demons such as access, appeal and viability, letting anyone come in and see a field of green, glorious grass and their favorite stars would be both a thank you to current fans and an invitation to the nonbelievers.

Perhaps it would be viewed in some quarters as a move unbecoming such a wildly profitable industry; MLB is chugging toward $11 billion in annual revenue.Yet the sport is filled with paradoxes that threaten sustainability.

The wildly-inflated, multi-billion dollar national and local TV contracts that enrichen everyone also ensures a wall of access must go up to protect that golden goose. The next generation of fans is essentially diverted – or barred altogether – from viewing their favorite team in the manner they’d prefer.At the ballpark, things are only getting more exclusive.

Stadiums both current and planned are shrinking; the Tampa Bay Rays reduced Tropicana Field capacity to 25,000 and hope to build a permanent ballpark with similar dimensions. The Texas Rangers’ new ballpark will shrink capacity from 48,000 to around 40,000. The Oakland Athletics’ dream home at Howard Terminal, should it ever be built, would seat 34,000, fewer seats than any park built in the last wave of construction.

Smaller venues create ticket scarcity, which means much higher prices. That’s great for bottom lines.But think about this for a moment: The younger generation MLB hopes to court can barely afford housing, let alone owning a home, having children or retiring their crippling student loan debt. The average age of a fan watching on TV is already north of 55 – a generation that fell in love with the sport when attending games was far more affordable.

 

Astros vs Rays

Astros vs Rays : Astros manager MLB 2019 well in early work today an depending on how BP goes could be available off bench today and if all is well would start tomorrow. The Rays are using the opener for the first time tomorrow and Cash said, much as last year, he won’t know until after today’s game who is pitching until after today’s game. RHP Yonny Chirinos said he expects to pitch, and would be the bulk guy.

Opening Day is in the books. With all due respect to last week’s Japan Series, the 2019 MLB regular season began in earnest Thursday. All 30 teams were in action with 15 games spread across the afternoon and evening. Spring training games are fun in their own way. Nothing quite compares to meaningful baseball though.

On the first full day of 2019, Bryce Harper made his debut with the Phillies (with Phillie Phanatic cleats), the Dodgers hit an Opening Day record eight homers, and Jordan Zimmermann flirted with a perfect game. Here is everything else you need to know about the season’s first day
Major League Baseball’s schedule parcels 2,430 games across 187 days. Not all will be idyllic.

There will be days and nights in September devoid of meaning. Punishingly hot summer stretches that make going to a game a physical challenge. And stretches of endless winter in certain parts of the country.Yet if you had to identify one day that almost always feels like a drag, it is this, the second day of the season.

Oh, some of Opening Day’s appeal endures: Nobody’s out of contention. The new slate of walk-up songs and between-pitches music still feel fresh, and not yet grating.The staff ace pitched yesterday. The franchise legend who threw out the first pitch has given way to the usual parade of regional vice presidents and Kiwanis Club chairs. The only flyovers might come from malnourished seagulls.

And the affliction seems particularly acute this year, as for the first time 30 teams opened on the same day.On Day 2, at a time when players, fans, fantasy diehards and degenerate gamblers remain hungry for action, 14 of 30 teams are taking the day off.

Now, there’s good reason for that, as MLB typically builds in an insurance day to make up season-openers in the event of postponements in cold-weather markets.More often, though, stadiums sit empty for no reason. Elsewhere, attendance drops precipitously, as the fair-weather crowd fades and a truer snapshot of a team’s season-ticket base emerges.

A view of Dodger Stadium before the opening day game against the Diamondbacks.A view of Dodger Stadium before the opening day game against the Diamondbacks. (Photo: Kelvin Kuo, USA TODAY Sports)It’s a grim prelude to a herky-jerky month littered with off days, weather delays and, generally, poor attendance.

No other sport faces such hurdles just as its season is getting off the ground. So, here’s one solution.Game 1 is for the dignitaries. Game 2 is for the people: Let them all in for free.

Let’s call this Fans’ Opening Day, or something similar. The premise is simple: At a time when baseball is once again battling demons such as access, appeal and viability, letting anyone come in and see a field of green, glorious grass and their favorite stars would be both a thank you to current fans and an invitation to the nonbelievers.

Perhaps it would be viewed in some quarters as a move unbecoming such a wildly profitable industry; MLB is chugging toward $11 billion in annual revenue.Yet the sport is filled with paradoxes that threaten sustainability.

The wildly-inflated, multi-billion dollar national and local TV contracts that enrichen everyone also ensures a wall of access must go up to protect that golden goose. The next generation of fans is essentially diverted – or barred altogether – from viewing their favorite team in the manner they’d prefer.At the ballpark, things are only getting more exclusive.

Stadiums both current and planned are shrinking; the Tampa Bay Rays reduced Tropicana Field capacity to 25,000 and hope to build a permanent ballpark with similar dimensions. The Texas Rangers’ new ballpark will shrink capacity from 48,000 to around 40,000. The Oakland Athletics’ dream home at Howard Terminal, should it ever be built, would seat 34,000, fewer seats than any park built in the last wave of construction.

Smaller venues create ticket scarcity, which means much higher prices. That’s great for bottom lines.But think about this for a moment: The younger generation MLB hopes to court can barely afford housing, let alone owning a home, having children or retiring their crippling student loan debt. The average age of a fan watching on TV is already north of 55 – a generation that fell in love with the sport when attending games was far more affordable.

The hurdles baseball faces in getting eyeballs to TV sets – cord-cutting, an endless sea of streaming options, the NFL’s 12-month news cycle, Fortnite – are not going away. Its ace in the hole has always been its massive amount of inventory and the unmatchable, pastoral setting a day at the ballpark affords.

Well, the inventory is sagging: Attendance dropped 4% in 2018. We’ve yet to see the long-term effects tanking and extreme roster churn in the analytics age have on fan loyalty.So why not let everyone – as many as you can cram into your stadium, anyway – get a taste of the product, for free.

Just ask the A’s about that. They took the randomest possible date last year– a midweek April game against the White Sox – and charged no admission.More than 46,000 showed up to the antiquated Oakland Coliseum, by far their largest crowd of the year.

Certainly, there’d be financial repercussions. Teams drew an average of 29,000 for their Game No. 2 date last year, which would mean an average loss of about $900,000 in ticket revenue per club. Those losses could be partially mitigated by selling naming rights for this day – what national brand wouldn’t want to be associated with free baseball? – and an uptick in concession revenue.

The short-term revenue loss is beside the point, of course. And it’s possible some execs would argue giving away the product cheapens it.Then again, it can’t be any worse than seas of empty seats that provide the backdrop for a significant number of April and September games. The good vibes could be milked for nearly two weeks, as the teams that started the season on the road eventually roll out their free game.At the least, it would inject some warmth into baseball’s coldest month.

White Sox vs Royals

White Sox vs Royals : Ian Kennedy’s first MLB career save helps the Kansas City Royals take the Royals hold on for 8-6 win over White Sox as Ian Kennedy gets his first.The Royals used a three-run Baseball 2019 third inning and a four-run sixth inning to take the White Sox vs Royals series against the White Sox. Big innings, speed lift Royals to 8-6 victory over White Sox Sporting Kansas City vs Los Angeles Galaxy.

Another week on the 2019 tennis circuit, another different champion.April is just about here, and no man or woman has yet managed to win more than one singles title on the main circuit this season.That’s amazing, isn’t it?” Ashleigh Barty said after keeping the streak alive on Saturday with a 7-6 (1), 6-3 victory against Karolina Pliskova in the Miami Open final.

But though Barty, an Australian, was the 14th WTA champion in 14 events, her winning a title of this magnitude bore no resemblance to a fluke.Her game is a varied thing of beauty, mate, and though at 5 feet 5 inches she is far from the most imposing player on tour, her tennis has been standing taller and taller in 2019.

She was a finalist in Sydney, a quarterfinalist at the Australian Open with many of her sports-savvy compatriots piling on the pressure by tracking her every stroke. She was then the key figure in Australia’s 3-2 victory over the United States on the road in the Fed Cup.

Though Elina Svitolina stopped her in the round of 16 at Indian Wells by winning the longest match of the women’s season (3 hours 12 minutes), there was no stopping Barty in Miami.For the second time in as many games, the start of the White Sox game against the Royals at Kauffman Stadium Saturday will be delayed by rain. The scheduled 1:15 start is being pushed back to 1:45.

The start of the Sox and Royals season opener Thursday was delayed one hour, 46 minutes.Here are the starting lineups as the Sox and Royals brace for a cold, damp afternoon with temperatures forecast in the low 40s for a high.

Royals manager Ned Yost stated his stance as simply as he could during spring training. The organization felt like Ian Kennedy would make the bullpen better. Period. Case closed. Kennedy transitioned from starter to reliever in Arizona.

Kennedy entered the regular season having started 277 consecutive games since his most recent relief appearance in the majors. That run ended when Kennedy pitched the eighth inning of Thursday’s season opener, his first relief appearance in the big leagues since Sept. 23, 2009 (third of his career).

Two days after he ended that almost 10-year drought, Kennedy emerged from the bullpen in the ninth inning on Saturday and earned the first save of his professional career as the Royals registered an 8-6 win in front of an announced crowd 13,533 on a cold and windy day at Kauffman Stadium.

“I thought Wily (Peralta) was going to go in,” Kennedy said. “He was kind of warming up and then they called and wanted me to warm up. That’s when the adrenaline and nerves kicked up. But nerves go away pretty quickly once you got first and second. That’s when you know you can’t give up any more singles.”
Kennedy gave up a pair of singles to start the ninth inning, putting the tying runs on base and the go-ahead run at the plate before he’d gotten an out. He then got a fly-out to center, a strikeout and a fly-out to right field to end the game.

“Not that quick,” Kennedy said of expecting to be thrown into the closer’s role. “I don’t think we ever talked about roles. That’s why we started getting ready about the sixth inning. I have noticed in the bullpen that things go pretty quick. You have everyone trying to stay ready.”

Peralta, who converted 14 of 14 save opportunities last season, pitched 1/3 of an inning and allowed two runs on Thursday. Yost said he still liked both Kennedy and Peralta as options late out of the bullpen.

“I like them both,” Yost said. “I’ve got Wily for tomorrow if I need it. I like them absolutely both.”With the win, the Royals clinched the victory in their three-game series. Last season, they didn’t win their first series until May 3-6 against the Detroit Tigers.

Jorge Soler and Billy Hamilton each had three hits for the Royals on Saturday. Soler drove in three runs, while Hamilton scored twice. Ryan O’Hearn also drove in a pair of runs in his first game of the season.

Adalberto Mondesi went 1 for 4 with a double, a run scored and a RBI. Soler and Mondesi became the first pair of teammates with three extra-base hits in the first two games of a season since Gerardo Parra and Trevor Story for the Colorado Rockies in 2016.Royals starting pitcher Jakob Junis (1-0) pitched five scoreless innings as the Royals jumped out to a 4-0 lead, but he ran into trouble in the sixth.

A pair of singles sandwiched around a strikeout set the table for Jose Abreu’s first homer of the season, a three-run blast on a 1-1 pitch that carried into the bullpen behind the left-field wall which made it a one-run game, 4-3, in the sixth. Left-handed reliever Timmy Hill replaced Junis and got the final out of the inning.

“It didn’t come back over the plate, it just didn’t get in enough on him,” Junis said of the sinker Abreu hit. “We had thrown him a steady diet of those all day, so I think he was just looking for it then. We threw one too many and it cost me a dinger and three runs, but thankfully the offense came through.”

 

Yankees vs Orioles

Yankees vs Orioles : The New York Yankees take on the Baltimore Orioles Saturday afternoon at 1 p.m. (YES) at Yankee Stadium. The New York Yankees conclude their opening four-game series of the 2019 MLB season on Sunday, March 31 when they host the Baltimore Orioles at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx.The Baltimore Orioles and New York Yankees do battle in a three-match series to kick off the new season,

League-wide 2019 MLB Opening Day is Thursday and starts at Yankee Stadium at 1:05 p.m. ET when the New York Yankees host the Baltimore Orioles. The Yankees won 100 games last year and return one of the most formidable lineups in the league, led by Aaron Judge and Giancarlo Stanton. In the other dugout, the Orioles won a league-low 47 games a year ago, but fared better against rival New York than most teams.

The latest Yankees vs. Orioles odds list New York as a -400 favorite (risk $400 to win $100), while Baltimore is at +285 (risk $100 to win $285). The over-under for total runs is 8.5 after opening at nine. Masahiro Tanaka gets his fourth Opening Day start for the Yankees, while Andrew Cashner starts the first game of the season for the second time in his career. Before laying any Yankees vs. Orioles picks of your own, you’ll want to see the 2019 MLB Opening Day predictions from SportsLine MLB expert Adam Thompson.

Thompson raked in the winnings as SportsLine’s top MLB handicapper last year, hitting on 61 percent of his money line picks for a massive profit of $4,062 to $100 players. He’s also on a scorching 23-4 run on his MLB picks dating back to last year, a streak that included hitting every World Series game and nailing the Mariners’ win over the Athletics in the 2019 opener in Japan.

Thompson, who covered major sports for 20 years as a writer and columnist before joining SportsLine as a senior writer and handicapper, cites deeply-researched stats and trends you haven’t considered to build his MLB success. Anybody who has followed his MLB picks is way, way up.

Now, Thompson has studied Yankees vs. Orioles on MLB Opening Day 2019 and locked in a confident money line play at SportsLine. Last season, he was an astonishing 11-0 when picking games involving the Orioles, so you’ll want to hear what he has to say.

Thompson knows the Yankees had the most powerful lineup in the history of baseball last year, belting 267 home runs, led by the 38 from Stanton. The former Marlin also had 102 runs and 100 RBIs in 61 at-bats. Judge is back and fully healthy, and had a monster spring training with six home runs and 14 RBIs.

There’s also the question on how the Orioles will score runs this season. They ranked dead-last in the American League in scoring last year and while they made few notable free agency moves, they are still projected for another 100-loss season.

But just because the Yankees are heavily favored at home doesn’t mean they’re the best value on the money line for MLB Opening Day 2019.

The Orioles were far and away the worst team in baseball last season, but a new year brings renewed optimism. It helps that they’ll face a pitcher in Tanaka who’s 0-2 in four Opening Day starts with a 9.49 ERA.

Regardless of how poor Baltimore was, it gets up for games at Yankee Stadium. The Orioles were a surprising 5-4 in the Bronx last year. Cashner shut down the pinstripes for one run over six innings in his second start of the season last year. Stanton and Judge are a combined 4-for-26 (.154) all-time against him.

Thompson has studied this matchup from every angle and unearthed a hidden x-factor you’re not even thinking about that determines which side of the money line has all the value. He’s only sharing what it is, and who to back, at SportsLine.
After a day break, we are on to game two of the 2019 season.

On Thursday, the Yankees won the Opening Day game against the Orioles fairly easily, after a good start from Masahiro Tanaka and a solid all-around game from the offense. The Yankees lost some annoying games to the Orioles last season, so it was nice to see them dispatch Baltimore without much trouble in the season opener. That win sees them currently on pace for a 162-0 record, which they will surely keep up.

As for today, there’s some more exciting stuff on the horizon. James Paxton gets the start on the mound to make his regular season Yankees debut. His acquisition from the Mariners was arguably the biggest move of the offseason for the Yankees. Now we get to see what he can do in pinstripes.

DJ LeMahieu also makes his first appearance of the season, getting the start at third base. Let’s check out the rest of the Yankees’ lineup.
There’s some shifting in the defensive positions and Greg Bird moves to the bench, but otherwise it’s fairly close to what the Yankees ran out on Opening Day. Let’s hope for a similar offensive output from this version.

Federer vs Isner

Federer vs Isner : The 2019 Miami Masters men’s singles final will be played on Sunday, March 31 between three-time winner Federer vs Isner. Roger Federer has made it into the final of the 2019 ATP Miami Open where he will face John Isner from the United States.Roger Federer and defending champion John Isner will contest the 2019 ATP Miami Open Final with a feeling of deja vu after previous Miami

He’s crouched behind the service line, on his tip toes, ready to pounce on anything that comes his way, and John Isner, his opponent in the Miami final, stands across from him, throwing down bullet serves.

The question that might determine if Federer wins his 28th ATP Masters 1000 title on Sunday: How many serves can he stop from hitting the back wall?

“I honestly love big servers, to watch them, [to see] if they’re going to ace every second or third point. For me, that’s exciting because it’s like a penalty shootout in [football], it’s just in tennis,” Federer said during his on-court interview with ESPN. “I’ll be the goalie on Sunday. I’ll try my very best. I’ll try to get as many balls back as possible.”

The three-time Miami Open presented by Itau champion has done David de Gea impressions well in the past against Isner. Federer leads their FedEx ATP Head2Head series 5-2, which includes a straight-sets win in the 2012 BNP Paribas Open final in Indian Wells. Isner won their most recent tour-level meeting, at the 2015 Rolex Paris Masters.

Fourth seed Roger Federer entered the American hardcourt swing with a point prove. His legacy is unquestionably intact, but he has set the bar so high which is why defeats in the earlier rounds of the big tournaments are likely to raise a few eyebrows. Following his fourth round defeat to Stefanos Tsitsipas at the Australian Open, the legendary Swiss took an extended break from tennis. He elected not to play in Rotterdam where he was the defending champion and instead, chose to compete in Dubai.

That decision paid off as he swept past the field and captured his 100th career singles title (avenging his loss to Tsitsipas in the championship match). Federer replicated his form to the BNP Paribas Open where he was denied glory by an inspired Dominic Thiem in the final. Following a rusty opening match in Miami where the former World No.1 came from a set down to beat Delray Beach Open champion Radu Albot, he only dropped an average of six games in his past five matches. A win over John Isner in the final will put the Swiss on top spot iLipscomb vs NJIT Live Stream : How To Watch NJIT vs Lipscomb 2019 NBA Basketball game Online Free HD TV Channeln the Race to London. Not too bad for the soon to be 38-year-old.

eventh seed John Isner has served his way to the final without the loss of a set. He also has proven to be the tiebreak king this fortnight winning 9 out of the 10 sets with a 7-6 scoreline. The tall American echoed his sentiments on how his game can be so disruptive to opponents due to his remarkable serve. His low-key approach to matches at the Hard Rock Stadium did not reflect his confidence when asked if he can defend his title on Sunday.

“I believe personally that I can win any tournament I enter because of how disruptive I can be and because of how well I can serve at times,” said Isner during the prematch press conference.The defending champion added, “I’m not surprised that I’m sitting here back in the final again.”

After a slow start to the year where he lost in the first round at the Australian Open, he reached three semifinals in the next four tournaments. With a combination of immense serving, composure and luck, he seems to have rediscovered the winning formula that made him champion in Miami exactly a year ago.

Roger Federer survived a real scare in the second round against Radu Albot but he has been different class since then. His victories over Daniil Medvedev, Kevin Anderson, and Denis Shapovalov were particluarrly crushing. Against Anderson and Medvedev, Federer broke serve a combined eight times (winning the first set against the South African 6-0). That should be a worrying sign for Isner – who in spite of being 10/10 on sets won – has not been so convincing especially during matches against Albert Ramos-Vinolas and Felix Auger-Aliassime. The young Canadian served for both the first and second set before nerves settled in and Isner inevitably won in two tiebreaks.

Federer will be a level above any opponent Isner has faced this week and he will pose much tougher questions on the American’s serve. The Swiss said he will resort to play the role of goalie on Sunday to try and play many balls back. This is not entirely straight forward for Federer especially if he runs out of patience converting his break point chances and it would be anyone’s game in the tiebreak. But given his poise and form, Federer should prevail and fittingly in a third set tiebreak to end Isner’s reign.

“I know what to expect – that he will not miss many serves. He’s got an amazing serve. One of the best in the game, forever. It’s really hard to play against him,” Federer said.But the 37-year-old’s semi-final against the 18-year-old Shapovalov wasn’t just any other match, Federer admitted. He feels a bit more amped when facing members of the #NextGenATP.

“I told my daughters before I walked out tonight that he wasn’t even born yet when I actually played on the pro tour already,” said Federer, who turned pro in 1998, one year before Shapovalov was, in fact, born. “So they’re like, ‘What? Hold on a second.’ They did the calculations. ‘So this guy’s really young?’ I was like, ‘Yeah, I’m really old.’ But it’s all good. It definitely gives me an extra pep. No doubt about it.”

Isner, the defending champion, returned to the Miami final with a 7-6(3), 7-6(4) win against Shapovalov’s friend and countryman 18-year-old Felix Auger-Aliassime. The teenager served for both sets.“Hopefully we’ll have a good match,” Federer told ESPN. “I’m excited to play John because he really had a tough match against Felix today. That was an awesome performance by him.”

The 33-year-old American has won all 10 sets he’s played and is 9-0 in tie-breaks.